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5 speakers 15 minutes each

Wed 29th May 2013

The Tabernacle

7pm

Alecky Blythe

Alecky Blythe

Alecky is a playwright and screenwriter who won a Time Out Award for her first play, Come Out Eli. In 2003, Alecky set up Recorded Delivery (Verbatim Theatre Company). The term 'recorded delivery' has now become synonymous with the verbatim technique she employs. In July 2009, Alecky's play The Girlfriend Experience transferred from the Royal Court to the Young Vic, and Do We Look Like Refugees? won a Fringe First Award at the Edinburgh Festival in 2010. Alecky's London Road won Best Musical at the Critics' Circle Awards and was revived in 2012 at the National Theatre  after its sellout in the Cottesloe in 2011. Her play, Where Have I Been All My Life? was produced at the New Vic Theatre in April 2012.  

Thomas Keneally

Thomas Keneally

Born in Sydney in 1935, Thomas Keneally completed his schooling at various schools on the New South Wales north coast before commencing theological studies for the Catholic priesthood. He abandoned this vocation in 1960 and turned to clerical work and schoolteaching. One of the most successful modern Australian writers, Keneally has been short-listed for the Booker Prize on 4 occasions: in 1972 for The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, Gossip from the Forest in 1975, and Confederates in 1979, before winning the prize in 1982 with Schindler's Ark. Schindler's Ark was later turned into the Oscar Award winning film Schindler's List directed by Steven Spielberg. Keneally has also won the Miles Franklin Award twice with Bring Larks and Heroes and Three Cheers for the Paraclete. Thomas Keneally was awarded the Order of Australia in 1983 for his services to Australian Literature.

Kevin Powers

Kevin Powers

Kevin Powers was born and raised in Richmond, VA. In 2004 and 2005 he served with the U.S. Army in Mosul and Tal Afar, Iraq. He studied English at Virginia Commonwealth University after his honorable discharge and received an M.F.A. in Poetry from the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas at Austin in 2012. His debut book The Yellow Birds won the Guardian first book award and has been hailed by critics since it came out in 2012.

Beeban Kidron

Beeban Kidron

Beeban Kidron is a British filmmaker who successfully navigates between pop culture and society’s darkest underworlds. Kidron is best known for directing Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004) and the Bafta-winning mini series Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1989), adapted from Jeannette Winterson’s novel of the same name. She is also the director of To Wong Foo Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar (1995) and Antonia and Jane (1991), as well as two documentaries on prostitution: Hookers, Hustlers, Pimps and their Johns (1993) and Sex, Death and the Gods (2011), a film about “devadasi,” or Indian “sacred prostitutes.”

In 2006 Kidron, with journalist and film critic Lindsay Mackie, founded FILMCLUB, an educational charity aimed at transforming the lives of young people through film. Through FILMCLUB, schools can screen films at no cost, and afterwards students discuss and review the films. Each week the charity reaches 220,000 children, in over 7,000 clubs. In 2012 she was created a life peer in the House of Lords.

James Meek

James Meek

James Meek was born in London and grew up in Scotland. He lived in Russia and Ukraine in the 1990s and, since 1999, has lived in London - currently in Bethnal Green. He published his first short stories in the early 1980s, while a student at Edinburgh University. His first novel, McFarlane Boils The Sea, was published in 1989. Since then he has published six more works of fiction: Last Orders (stories, 1992) Drivetime (a novel, 1995) The Museum Of Doubt (stories, 2000) The People’s Act of Love (a novel, 2005) We Are Now Beginning Our Descent (a novel, 2008) and The Heart Broke In (2012). People’s Act, which was published in thirty countries, was longlisted for the Booker Prize and won the Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje prize and the Scottish Arts Council book of the year prize. Descent won the 2008 Le Prince Maurice Prize. The Heart Broke In was shortlisted for the 2012 Costa Prize. James Meek has written for a number of newspapers and magazines, and is currently a contributing editor to the London Review of Books.