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5 speakers 15 minutes each

Mon 25th Feb 2013

The Tabernacle

7pm

SoldOut

Sanderson Jones

Sanderson Jones

Sanderson Jones is the co-founder of The Sunday Assembly, the UK's first atheist church. In 2012 he entered the Guinness Book of Records for the world's longest hug, and became the first person to play the Sydney Opera House, having sold every single ticket in person.

Salena Godden

Salena Godden

Salena Godden has been variously described as 'doyenne of the spoken word scene' (Ian McMillan, Radio 3, The Verb), 'The Mae West madam of the salon' (The Sunday Times) and 'Everything the Daily Mail is terrified of' (Kerrang! Magazine). Springfield Road is a journey into her childhood, and perhaps your childhood too. A salute to every curly-top, scabby knee'd, mixed-up, half-crazy kid out there. It's about discovering that life is unfair and that parents die, but it's also about seeking the good in the world, the humour and the tenderness. It is the very antithesis of a misery memoir.

Paul Mason

Paul Mason

Paul Mason is the Economics Editor of Newsnight. He was born in Greater Manchester and studied music and politics at Sheffield University, switching to journalism in the early 1990s. He joined the BBC in 2001, making his first live appearance on the day of 9/11. His groundbreaking reports on the rise of China as an economic power won him the Wincott Award in 2003. He has covered stories as diverse as Hurricane Katrina, gang violence on Merseyside and the social impact of mobile phones in Africa.

He reported on the collapse of Lehman Brothers live from outside its New York HQ and "has hardly stopped for breath since then", reporting on the social and economic impact of the global meltdown from the mean streets of Gary, Indiana to the elite salons of Davos. He is the author of two books of non-fiction, Live Working or Die Fighting: How the working class went global and Meltdown: The end of the age of greed – and has twice been nominated for the Orwell Prize.

John Gray

John Gray

John Gray is a writer and political philosopher. He has been Professor of Politics at Oxford University, Visiting Professor at Harvard and Yale and Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics. He now writes full time. His books include Straw Dogs (‘That rarest of things, a contemporary work of philosophy, wholly accessible and profoundly relevant to the rapidly evolving world’ Will Self), Al-Qaeda and What It Means To Be Modern (‘The most arresting account I have read of our current crisis’ Ian McEwan) and Heresies (‘Swiftian contempt for our latter-day priestlings, the believers in progress’ John Banville). His latest book is The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths.

Iain Sinclair

Iain Sinclair

Iain Sinclair is a British writer who has lived in Hackney since 1969. His books exploring the myth and matter of London have acquired cult status and include London Orbital (‘sentence for sentence, there is no more interesting writer at work in English,’ Daily Telegraph) and Hackney, That Rose-Red Empire. His novels include Downriver, which won the James Tait Black Prize; Radon Daughters, Landor’s Tower and Dining on Stones. He has also written and presented a number of documentaries. Asylum won the short film prize at the Montreal Festival, and Swandown, a film about his 160-mile journey along the River Thames in a swan pedalo, was released in cinemas across the country in 2012.