Warning: Use of undefined constant DateOfEvent - assumed 'DateOfEvent' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/customer/www/bristol.5x15.com/public_html/wp-content/themes/bristol/single-event.php on line 53

Warning: Use of undefined constant EventTime - assumed 'EventTime' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/customer/www/bristol.5x15.com/public_html/wp-content/themes/bristol/single-event.php on line 54

5 speakers 15 minutes each

Sat 10th Dec 2011

Amnesty International

7pm

Beverley Naidoo

Beverley Naidoo

Beverley Naidoo is a novelist who was born in South Africa under Apartheid. As a student, Beverley began to question racism and at 21 she was arrested for taking part in the resistance movement. In 1965 Beverley came to England and married another South African exile. Beverley started writing when her own children were growing up. Her first book, Journey to Jo'burg, won The Other Award in Britain.

It opened a window onto children's struggles under apartheid. In South Africa it was banned until 1991, the year after Nelson Mandela was released from jail. For subsequent books including Chain of Fire she had to rely on reports and photos smuggled out of South Africa. But after 26 years she was at last able to return freely to research in the country. No Turning Back and Out of Bounds followed. In all her stories, young characters from different backgrounds face tense conflicts and choices. Beverley chose London as the setting for her first novel set outside South Africa but the issues are as dramatic. Two refugee children face a terrible personal loss as well as injustice. The Other Side of Truth won her the Carnegie Medal. Death of an Idealist, her biography-cum-memoir of her cousin Neil Aggett, physician and trade unionist, was published in 2012, thirty years after his death in a South African security police cell.

Giles Duley

Giles Duley

Giles Duley was born in 1971 in London. After 10 years as an editorial photographer in the fashion and music industries, Duley began focusing his work on humanitarian projects. He has worked with charities such as Médecins sans Frontiers, IOM and the UNHCR to highlight lesser known stories deserving of public attention and action. In 2011, whilst on patrol with 75th Cavalry Regiment, United States Army in Afghanistan, Duley stepped on an improvised explosive device. He was severely injured, losing both legs and an arm. His work has been exhibited and published worldwide in many respected publications including Vogue, GQ, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Sunday Times, The Observer and New Statesman. In 2010 he was nominated for an Amnesty International Media Award and was a winner at the Prix de Paris in 2010 and 2012. His self-portrait was selected for the 2012 Taylor Wessing Exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery.

Craig Brown

Craig Brown

Craig Brown has been writing the hugely popular Private Eye celebrity diary since 1989. He has also written parodies for many other publications, including The Daily Telegraph, Vanity Fair, The Times and The Guardian. His book One on One (2011) examines the curious nature of different types of meeting, from the oddity of encounters with the Royal Family (who start giggling during a recital by TS Eliot) to those often perilous meetings between old and young (Mark Twain terrifying Rudyard Kipling) and between young and old (the 23-year-old Sarah Miles having her leg squeezed by the nonagenarian Bertrand Russell), to contemporary random encounters (George Galloway meeting Michael Barrymore on Celebrity Big Brother).

Terry Waite

Terry Waite

Terry Waite is a humanitarian and author who previously worked as a hostage negotiator in the 1980s. He was Archbishop of Canterbury Robert Runcie's Assistant for Anglican Communion Affairs in the 1980s. As an envoy for the Church of England, he travelled to Lebanon to try to secure the release of four hostages including journalist John McCarthy. On 20 January 1987, he was taken hostage. Waite remained in captivity for 1,763 days, the first four years of which were spent in total solitary confinement, and it was not until 18 November 1991 that he was released. Following his release, he wrote the book Taken on Trust which became an international bestseller, as did his second book, Footfalls in Memory. Waite is also president of the charity, Y Care International (the YMCA's international development and relief agency), and patron of AbleChildAfrica and Habitat for Humanity Great Britain. He is also president of Emmaus UK, a charity for formerly homeless people.

Nick Broomfield

Nick Broomfield

Nick Broomfield is a documentary filmmaker. He studied Law at Cardiff, and Political Science at Essex University before going on to study Film at the National Film School. He made his first film Who Cares about slum clearance in Liverpool, while at University. He is known for his idiosyncratic style of filmmaking which he developed while making Driving Me Crazy in 1988. As it was a film hopelessly out of control, Nick decided to place himself and the producer of the film in the story, as a way of making sense of the event. This experiment led to a more investigative and experimental type of filmmaking as seen in films such as The Leader, His Driver and his Driver’s Wife, Aileen Wurnos, Kurt and Courtney and Biggie and Tupac. His most recent film is Sarah Palin: You Betcha. Nick is the recipient of the following awards amongst others: Sundance first prize, British Academy Award, Prix Italia, Dupont Peabody Award, Grierson Award, Hague Peace Prize, Amnesty International Doen Award.